Scientific Proof That Sugar Daddy Relationships Really Do Work

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Even though sugar daddy dat­ing has got­ten more pop­u­lar in recent years, a lot of peo­ple still have doubts about the legit­i­macy of hav­ing a sugar daddy—many peo­ple assume that it can’t pos­si­bly be a healthy rela­tion­ship if it’s based on money. But the results of a new study pro­vide a pretty solid foun­da­tion for why sugar daddy dat­ing and the rela­tion­ships that stem from it can actu­ally be pretty successful.

The study, which was pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Per­son­al­ity and Social Psy­chol­ogy, con­ducted five exper­i­ments on nearly 900 par­tic­i­pants and found that the major­ity of straight men took a hit to their self-esteem if their part­ner suc­ceeded, such as if their part­ner made more money than they did. “Men auto­mat­i­cally inter­pret a partner’s suc­cess as their own fail­ure, even when they’re not in direct com­pe­ti­tion,” said the study’s lead researcher. Women, on the other hand, actu­ally felt bet­ter about their rela­tion­ship over­all if their man was suc­cess­ful and their self-esteem was not affected by their partner’s success.

This study just goes to show that men want and are sat­is­fied with being the provider in a rela­tion­ship, and sugar daddy dat­ing allows them to live out that desire. In the same regard, women still seem to favor a man who is suc­cess­ful, both emo­tion­ally and finan­cially. It’s like women are still nat­u­rally drawn to a man with the finan­cial means to be the strong provider in the rela­tion­ship. With sugar daddy dat­ing, both par­ties are get­ting what they want. Judg­ing by this research, it’s no won­der that so many sugar daddy/sugar baby rela­tion­ships are so suc­cess­ful, and can even lead to com­mit­ted, exclu­sive, and long-term relationships.

What do you think: Would you ever con­sider dat­ing some­one who was less suc­cess­ful than you?

Source:

McA­teer, A., “Suc­cess­ful woman seeks sup­port­ive boyfriend: an impos­si­bil­ity, study says,” The Globe and Mail web site, August 29, 2013; http://goo.gl/XB92hw.